As the new year approaches, you’ll probably hear lots of folks say, “new year, new me.” Well how about, “new year, new savings?”

We’re going to give you a couple of inexpensive energy saving tips that are easy for you to apply. Doing so will help lessen your carbon footprint while adding some extra cash to your pockets. So if your new year resolution is to save money, these tips will make sure your electricity bill is accomplishing just that.

  1. Adjust your thermostat, or even better, upgrade to a programmable one.
  2. Replace your HVAC filter monthly.
  3. Lower the temperature of your water heater.
  4. Wash your clothes with cold water and air dry (if possible).
  5. Replace your old light bulbs with new efficient LEDs.

    Adjust your thermostat, or even better, upgrade to a programmable one.

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, “You can save as much as 10 percent a year on heating and cooling by simply turning your thermostat back 7˚-10˚F for 8 hours a day from its normal setting.” Getting to that 10 percent, will ultimately depend on you.

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The easiest way to follow this approach is to acclimate your thermostat temperature to the weather outside. This means if it’s cold outside, keep your thermostat low at about 68 degrees while you and others are home. But once everyone leaves for the day, turn your thermostat down even more, so that it can mimic the cold weather outside.

This same method applies to when it’s warm outside. During the summer, try to keep your home around 78 degrees when inside, but once everyone leaves for the day, raise your thermostat even higher. Following this approach will lessen the amount of times your AC is turned on, which will lead to savings.

An easy way to accomplish this task is to upgrade your thermostat to a programmable one. These types of thermostats usually offer customers the ability to monitor and adjust temperatures from their phones even when they’re not home. This means you’ll always be in control of your thermostat.

Replace your HVAC filter monthly.

This one is pretty simple, and should already be a part of your monthly routines. If you haven’t changed your filter, or simply have forgotten about it, do yourself a favor and change it immediately. This will help you breathe cleaner air, while at the same time lowering your electricity bill.

Filters help catch dirt and pollutants before they enter into your HVAC system. When they become worn out, those pollutants seep through, and begin to clog your HVAC system. This means your air will have a tougher time traveling, which means your HVAC system will need to  work in overtime.

Regular replacement will help prevent those clogs – keeping your HVAC system running efficiently.

Lower the temperature of your water heater.

Water heating can account for up to 12 percent of your utility bill. That’s a big chunk. One way to lower this area of your utility bill, is to lower your water heater to 120 degrees. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, “For every 10˚F reduction in temperature, you can save from 3%-5% on your water heating costs.”

Reducing both hot water temperature and use around your home, can quickly increase your savings.

Wash your clothes with cold water and air dry (if possible).

Piggybacking off the last tip, washing your clothes with cold water is much more cost efficient. Using warm or hot water to wash your clothes requires the use of more energy, as opposed to just washing in regular cold water.

Once your load is done washing, see if you can air dry your clothes. If you live in a sunny location, take advantage of the sun, and let your clothes hang dry. For those who aren’t as fortunate to live in a sunny location, there is still another solution. If you’re washing your jeans or some heavy duty pants, air dry those in your bathroom. By the next day, they should be good to go.

Replace your old light bulbs with new efficient LEDs.

If your home is still rocking incandescent bulbs or compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), do yourself a favor and get rid of them. LED lights are inexpensive in today’s market.

LED lights are the epitome of efficiency, which is the complete opposite of incandescent bulbs. While CFLs are better than incandescent bulbs, they still are no match for LEDs. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, “Residential LEDs – especially ENERGY STAR rated products – use at least 75% less energy, and last 25 times longer, than incandescent lighting.”

Implementing these tips now will save you money and help you accomplish your new year resolution.